Tag: save your local wildlife

Have you seen the Northern Saw-whet Owl?

Traipsing around a mature forest near a river, you spot a small, hunkering puffball in the dense foliage. It’s standing stock-still as if any slight movement will betray its presence. You look closer and see two bright, amber eyes staring fiercely back at you.

Later, when you leave the area, you hear a high-pitched, rhythmic tooting that sounds almost like electronic beeping. You were right: you were lucky to have spotted a Northern Saw-whet Owl!

Read More

Birds that Winter in Canada

Every year, 3.5 billion birds fly South for the winter after spending the summer up North. While these birds are strong for enduring such a long trip, the birds that stay in Canada are even stronger, braving storms, snow and freezing temperatures!

Winter brings a shortage of natural water and food supply and limited shelter to stay warm and safe from predators. Here is a look at some of the birds that winter in Canada!

Read More

Birds of the Pacific Flyaway

Many birds—from the largest waterfowl to the tiniest songbird—migrate. These annual journeys are incredible marathons, spanning thousands of miles and taking birds across countries and continents. As you may expect, migration can be a dangerous endeavor for birds. Food scarcity, disorienting city lights, and habitat loss can affect the migratory success of birds. Read more to learn about how birds migrate and what visitors you may see this winter in Metro Vancouver as birds stopover!

Read More

Tips to Protect Local Biodiversity on World Habitat Day

Today is World Habitat Day, started by the United Nations in 1985 to reflect on the state of our towns and cities, and on the basic right of all to adequate shelter.

Balancing wildlife’s needs for habitat and human’s right to adequate shelter can be a delicate one. This year’s theme, Housing For All: A Better Urban Future, reflects this balance, as we must consider environmental factors while creating housing for all.

Read More

Preparing Your Yard for Fall Friends

Your yard provides a rich resource of food and shelter to wildlife all year round. In the fall it can be more so as food and a safe place to live become harder to find. While you might want to... Read More

Wildlife and Wildfires

The wildfires, north and south of Vancouver have, at times, made it hard to breathe and have given us a sense of “unease”. Even though we live in urban settings and the wildfires are hundreds of kilometers away, we still feel the impact of the fires. Wildlfe Rescue provides care to hundreds of birds at this time of year, some displaced by wildfires and many, many injured in window and car impacts.

Read More

Protecting Your Local Wildlife

Every year, approximately five billion pounds of pesticides are used to control pest populations – harming local wildlife on the ground, sea, and sky. Chemical pest control solutions are a common part of our lives – whether it is a golf course, restaurant, or our own home. These different chemicals have a fatal effect on our wildlife – even threatening some wildlife populations. Each chemical may have a different impact on wildlife some fatal, others may bioaccumulate and others may pose no harm.

Read More

The Ultimate Quick Guide to Hummingbird Feeders

Ideally, all hummingbird feeders should be taken down in September of each year before migration begins. Leaving feeders up will not discourage migration, as hummingbirds that migrate are instinctually driven to do so, however; it can alter their behaviors. In some cases, these feeders are left up unknowingly and without proper care, which can ultimately lead to the fungal infections, starvation and death of the hummingbirds which have become dependent on them for survival.

Read More

Oil-Based Pollution Continues to Harm Wildlife

Patients who fall victim to contamination due to oil pollution arrive at Wildlife Rescue hospital in critical condition and have a hard time regulating their body temperature efficiently. They have poor and weakened feather structure that is critical for waterproofing.  Once the oil has touched the bird’s plumage the bird tries to compensate for the loss of body heat by using its fat stores. This process of compensation is extremely exhausting for the bird and causing weakness and health complications if not treated immediately.

Read More

Tender Care for Eurasian Collared-Dove

Over the last 10 years, the Eurasian Collared-Dove who often is mistaken for a pigeon has become a frequent visitor and resident on the west coast of Canada. Their history originates from Asia to the Bahamas in the 70’s and slowly into the United States where they were found in Florida and moving further into other parts of North America. These exotic birds are still scarce, but the numbers are increasing as bird watchers are noticing their presence throughout the lower mainland, Fraser Valley, Okanagan, and along the coast.

Read More
« Previous