Tag: conservation

Salmonella Outbreak in Siskins

It is an irruptive year for Pine Siskins! Each Winter, these nomadic finches range widely and erratically across North America, their migrations heavily food driven. These past few months, dense flocks of siskins have been seen across the Pacific Northwest. It is believed that the staggering numbers of Pine Siskins are due to a shortage of food in the northern range of siskins in Canada’s boreal forest. 

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Help Grounded Seabirds

As we roll into the fall and crisp leaves fall to the ground, birds take to the skies. This time of year, adults and their young begin their journey south in search of warmer climates. 

 

Migration can be like an obstacle course for these feathered travelers. They can be thrown off their route by city lights of buildings and towers and crash into windows. These challenges cause exhaustion and starvation among stranded wildlife. 

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Wildlife and Wildfires

The wildfires, north and south of Vancouver have, at times, made it hard to breathe and have given us a sense of “unease”. Even though we live in urban settings and the wildfires are hundreds of kilometers away, we still feel the impact of the fires. Wildlfe Rescue provides care to hundreds of birds at this time of year, some displaced by wildfires and many, many injured in window and car impacts.

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Protecting Your Local Wildlife

Every year, approximately five billion pounds of pesticides are used to control pest populations – harming local wildlife on the ground, sea, and sky. Chemical pest control solutions are a common part of our lives – whether it is a golf course, restaurant, or our own home. These different chemicals have a fatal effect on our wildlife – even threatening some wildlife populations. Each chemical may have a different impact on wildlife some fatal, others may bioaccumulate and others may pose no harm.

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Unfortunate Outcome for Rare Pelagic Cormorant

Recently, one juvenile Pelagic Cormorant was found on Granville street bridge where a Good Samaritan rescued him just before he was hit by a car. Unfortunately, incidents like these are a common occurrence – many birds nest on the bridge trestles (under the bridge on the structure/framework), making them more at-risk to car accidents, human disturbances and predatorial challenges.

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Fighting Chance for Red Crossbill Pair

Recently, two nestlings were in critical need of supportive care after they were found abandoned in Stanley Park. The kind-hearted Samaritan monitored the surroundings for a few hours in hope of parents to return but without any luck, it was evident the nestlings wouldn’t survive much longer without nutrition, hydration and potential predator attack at their vulnerable stage.

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Group of California Quail Ready to Return Home

The large group of quails has been growing and developing slowly over the last few weeks and has gained weight and are starting to show signs of flight. They are not in the final stage of their pre-conditioning release and in a large enclosure that mimics their natural environment.

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Western Small-Footed Bat Unique to Wildlife Rescue Hospital

This is a unique species at Wildlife Rescue and has not been its care in the 40 years of operations. It is not known to live within the lower mainland but instead in the dry interior valleys of B.C. Working with the regional biologist and bat specialist we are assessing what and how the bat has come to the lower mainland and if this species will continue to expand their habitat or it is a lone individual in the wrong place.

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Abandoned Nestling Learning Essential Skills at Wildlife Rescue Hospital

Like many other birds, Black-headed Grosbeak breed in British Columbia and then migrate south to warmer climates. The Black-headed Grosbeak males are easily identifiable by its orange breasts, blackheads, and black and white wings. Females have brown heads and orange and brown breasts. Both males and females have large bills that assist them in gleaning foliage and assembling nests.

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Strike Two for Sociable Birds

Waxwing’s diet mainly revolves around fruits and berries (such as strawberries, mulberries, and raspberries). Large quantities of over-ripe fruit that contain alcohol sugar from the fruit converts into alcohol through fermentation. This can be fatal for a Cedar Waxwings diet by causing disorientation leading to window strikes.

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