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Rare Albino Northwestern Crow Looking for Support!

The most common crow sighting in British Columbia you will see along the shorelines is the Northwestern crow. Unlike American Crows, Northwestern Crows are smaller with a deeper voice and are often found along beaches, islands or at landfill sites searching for scraps of food. These large passerines have a long, thick bill, broad wings, and a moderately long tail. The highly sociable birds communicate visually when in flight or through their distinct calls. They soar beautifully in the sky and play with each other on the wing, chasing and swooping one another aggressively.


Western Small-Footed Bat Unique to Wildlife Rescue Hospital

This is a unique species at Wildlife Rescue and has not been its care in the 40 years of operations. It is not known to live within the lower mainland but instead in the dry interior valleys of B.C. Working with the regional biologist and bat specialist we are assessing what and how the bat has come to the lower mainland and if this species will continue to expand their habitat or it is a lone individual in the wrong place.


Abandoned Nestling Learning Essential Skills at Wildlife Rescue Hospital

Like many other birds, Black-headed Grosbeak breed in British Columbia and then migrate south to warmer climates. The Black-headed Grosbeak males are easily identifiable by its orange breasts, blackheads, and black and white wings. Females have brown heads and orange and brown breasts. Both males and females have large bills that assist them in gleaning foliage and assembling nests.


Strike Two for Sociable Birds

Waxwing’s diet mainly revolves around fruits and berries (such as strawberries, mulberries, and raspberries). Large quantities of over-ripe fruit that contain alcohol sugar from the fruit converts into alcohol through fermentation. This can be fatal for a Cedar Waxwings diet by causing disorientation leading to window strikes.


Year-Round Bird Faces Severe Head Trauma

Like many other birds in British Columbia, female Red Crossbills create nests out of twigs from conifer trees and line the inside with materials such as needles, feathers, and hair. However, they tend to place their nests especially high up – up to 70 ft in the air – near thick foliage by the trunk of the tree. These incredible birds are monogamous and tend to nest in spring but will breed in late summer through fall or from late winter to early spring.


Spotted Towhee Survives Nest Disturbance

A familiar sight in British Columbia, male Spotted Towhees have reddish-orange flanks, black wings, and grey underwings, though the females have grey wings instead of black. These clever sparrows tend to dart from place to place by hopping rather than flying since they mainly forage for insects (such as beetles, ladybugs, crickets, grasshoppers, moths, and spiders), berries, seeds, and acorns (such as raspberries, blackberries, chickweed, oats, corn, and cherries).


How to Protect Ground Nesting Wildlife

Recently, two baby Killdeer were rescued after someone found them abandoned with no parents nearby. Wildlife Rescue staff suspect the parents may potentially be struck by a vehicle or other urban challenges, an all-too-common occurrence this time of year.
Killdeer nest on the ground or flat roofs until the eggs hatch 24 days later. The parents look after their young until they are ready to take flight after approximately 25 days. These two babies will be raised at the Wildlife Rescue’s hospital until they are young adults and are capable of surviving on their own.


Support Your Local Wildlife on Canada Day!

Patrolling up and down the rivers and shorelines, the beautiful Belted Kingfisher with its heavy frame and vigorous flight can easily be spotted. Its small feet and large head give it a unique look. The Belted Kingfisher with a shaggy crest on the top and back of its head and a beautiful blue-gray color and fine white spotting on the wing and tail. Females have a broad rusty band on their bellies. 


California Quail Ready to be Released in Osoyoos!

Staff and volunteers have worked hard in the last 3 weeks, providing, much-needed warmth and a nutritional diet of seeds, chick mix, and insects to ensure these babies can make it into adulthood and safely return home. They are now half their adult weight and are growing their flight feathers and crest feathers.


Great Blue Heron Fledglings Need Your Help!

Great Blue Herons are a familiar sight on British Columbia’s coast with wide wings, long “S” shaped necks, and grey-blue feathers. Their remarkably still stance in water, the plumes on their heads, and the black line above their eyes make them distinctive from any other bird.