Blog

Sora waterbird with a Candy-Corn Bill Survives Cat Attack

The Sora is a small waterbird of the family Rallidae, sometimes referred to as the sora rail or sora crake. This small chicken-like bird is chubby with uniquely long toes that help it to tackle floating vegetation when searching for food. Soras are grayish-brown with white-edged feathers, a dark throat patch with vertical white lines, a black mask from the bill to the eye and a white patch under the tail.  The bill is bright yellow which might make you think of Hallowe’en candy corns.


Great Blue Heron Survivors Released to Rookery

Thanks to the efforts of Wildlife Rescue staff and you the young herons were raised under supportive care at Wildlife Rescue hospital. One heron was much older than the other and developed his skills quickly and therefore was released a few weeks earlier and the other joined him a few weeks later.


Group of California Quail Ready to Return Home

The large group of quails has been growing and developing slowly over the last few weeks and has gained weight and are starting to show signs of flight. They are not in the final stage of their pre-conditioning release and in a large enclosure that mimics their natural environment.


Navigating Bats in Your Community

Wildlife Rescue Support Centre has been busy answering curious finders and coordinating the increased appearance of bats in the last 3 months. Although the majority of the 208 of calls are inquiries only about bat safety and protocol, Wildlife Rescue has seen a surge in the number of bats who need supportive care and treatment.


Western Small-Footed Bat Unique to Wildlife Rescue Hospital

This is a unique species at Wildlife Rescue and has not been its care in the 40 years of operations. It is not known to live within the lower mainland but instead in the dry interior valleys of B.C. Working with the regional biologist and bat specialist we are assessing what and how the bat has come to the lower mainland and if this species will continue to expand their habitat or it is a lone individual in the wrong place.


Pacific-slope Flycatcher Trio Orphaned After Fallen Nest

Recently, three baby flycatchers were brought to Wildlife Rescue after an onlooker noticed the fallen nest and no parents nearby. These orphaned nestlings were severely dehydrated and required immediate care. Pacific-slope Flycatchers nest with their parents for 14-15 days and are incapable of self-feeding.


Learn to Co-Exist With Bats!

Bats contribute to our environment in both invisible and visible ways. At night, they are our pest control, since one bat can eat as many as a thousand mosquitoes in an hour. Not only do they control pest populations (which aids the agricultural industry), bats can also pollinate plants. It has been estimated that a hungry bat can devour up to 3,000 insects in one night! Not only does this reduce the need for farmers to use pesticides, but it also helps manage the overpopulation of certain insect groups (including mosquitoes).


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