Tag: wildlife

Protect Your Local Killdeers

Due to their friendly nature, Killdeer are unafraid of inhabiting urban areas – which can lead them to great harm. Sports fields, golf courses, and lawns are open spots that Killdeer love. Unfortunately, these man-made open fields often use pesticides and frequently mow to keep the grass at a satisfactory level, which can harm fledglings a great deal. Pesticides, when ingested, are dangerous – and the loss of insects because of insecticides can lower their chance of survival. When Killdeer lose insects, they lose a vital food source. As well, Killdeer often nest roadside, leaving them vulnerable to vehicle collisions.

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Waterfowl Wildlife Prone to Human Disturbances

Double-crested cormorants make their nesting homes on the coastlines of southern BC. They are an iridescent greenish-black, with a bright yellow beak, and white tufts over their eyes during the breeding season. They like to hang out on rocky shorelines and dive for fish.

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Rooftop Goslings Continue to Face Challenges

Spring is one of the busiest times of the year for Wildlife Rescue especially with “Rooftop Rescues”. Last year, the rescue team was managing 10 rescues a day to save fluffy little goslings and bringing them to safety with their families.

While nesting on rooftops seems like a safe place for goslings, it can be very dangerous for young geese. To make sure goslings are not harmed by rooftop nesting, the best thing we can do is prevent it!

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Your Donation Funded Animal Care Facility Improvements

Thanks to your incredible support, several animal care infrastructure projects have been successfully completed!

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Your Donation Helped Build the Medical Treatment Centre!

Your generous response enabled construction of the Medical Treatment Centre to be completed just a few months before COVID-19. Thank you for making this project a reality!

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Spring into Action

Every year, signs of spring fill the air as we feel the temperatures lifting, hear the chorus of year-round and migratory birds returning and the smell of fresh green grass as we step outside. It’s the perfect time to welcome this revitalizing energy into your backyard by preparing for these feathered friends.

In British Columbia Chickadees, Sparrows, Starlings, Robins, Northern Flickers, Bushtits, Finches, Steller’s Jay and Hummingbirds are a few of the common backyard birds looking for mates and shelter to thrive during the busy season.

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Entangled Great Blue Heron a Success Story

A magnificent sight on British Columbia’s coastline, Great Blue Herons are a symbol of the brilliance of nature with their wide wings, “S” shaped necks and beautiful grey-blue feathers. Their peacefully still stance in the water and their incredible blue plumes set them apart.

Recently, a Great Blue Heron was admitted into Wildlife Rescue’s care after being found trapped and hanging from a tree. Thankfully, after being treated with pain medication and rest, the Great Blue Heron was able to be released back to nature where it belongs.

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Endangered Barn Owl Entangled in Netting

Found entangled in netting, a barn owl was recently brought to Wildlife Rescue in critical condition where the non-responsive animal was treated for dehydration and hypothermia. Unfortunately, cases like this one are common – netting such as plastic six-pack rings and even single-use masks can be fatal for wildlife. In fact, barn owls are so at-risk that they are featured as one of the many species on British Columbia’s red-list.

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2020: The Year in Review

Wildlife Rescue faced many challenges in 2020, but dedicated and compassionate supporters, volunteers, and staff worked hard together to help thousands of wildlife in need.

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Salmonella Outbreak in Siskins

It is an irruptive year for Pine Siskins! Each Winter, these nomadic finches range widely and erratically across North America, their migrations heavily food driven. These past few months, dense flocks of siskins have been seen across the Pacific Northwest. It is believed that the staggering numbers of Pine Siskins are due to a shortage of food in the northern range of siskins in Canada’s boreal forest. 

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