Tag: biodiversity

Protecting Your Local Wildlife

Every year, approximately five billion pounds of pesticides are used to control pest populations – harming local wildlife on the ground, sea, and sky. Chemical pest control solutions are a common part of our lives – whether it is a golf course, restaurant, or our own home. These different chemicals have a fatal effect on our wildlife – even threatening some wildlife populations. Each chemical may have a different impact on wildlife some fatal, others may bioaccumulate and others may pose no harm.

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Sora waterbird with a Candy-Corn Bill Survives Cat Attack

The Sora is a small waterbird of the family Rallidae, sometimes referred to as the sora rail or sora crake. This small chicken-like bird is chubby with uniquely long toes that help it to tackle floating vegetation when searching for food. Soras are grayish-brown with white-edged feathers, a dark throat patch with vertical white lines, a black mask from the bill to the eye and a white patch under the tail.  The bill is bright yellow which might make you think of Hallowe’en candy corns.

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The Ultimate Quick Guide to Hummingbird Feeders

Ideally, all hummingbird feeders should be taken down in September of each year before migration begins. Leaving feeders up will not discourage migration, as hummingbirds that migrate are instinctually driven to do so, however; it can alter their behaviors. In some cases, these feeders are left up unknowingly and without proper care, which can ultimately lead to the fungal infections, starvation and death of the hummingbirds which have become dependent on them for survival.

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Tender Care for Eurasian Collared-Dove

Over the last 10 years, the Eurasian Collared-Dove who often is mistaken for a pigeon has become a frequent visitor and resident on the west coast of Canada. Their history originates from Asia to the Bahamas in the 70’s and slowly into the United States where they were found in Florida and moving further into other parts of North America. These exotic birds are still scarce, but the numbers are increasing as bird watchers are noticing their presence throughout the lower mainland, Fraser Valley, Okanagan, and along the coast.

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Unfortunate Outcome for Rare Pelagic Cormorant

Recently, one juvenile Pelagic Cormorant was found on Granville street bridge where a Good Samaritan rescued him just before he was hit by a car. Unfortunately, incidents like these are a common occurrence – many birds nest on the bridge trestles (under the bridge on the structure/framework), making them more at-risk to car accidents, human disturbances and predatorial challenges.

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Fighting Chance for Red Crossbill Pair

Recently, two nestlings were in critical need of supportive care after they were found abandoned in Stanley Park. The kind-hearted Samaritan monitored the surroundings for a few hours in hope of parents to return but without any luck, it was evident the nestlings wouldn’t survive much longer without nutrition, hydration and potential predator attack at their vulnerable stage.

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Group of California Quail Ready to Return Home

The large group of quails has been growing and developing slowly over the last few weeks and has gained weight and are starting to show signs of flight. They are not in the final stage of their pre-conditioning release and in a large enclosure that mimics their natural environment.

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Abandoned Nestling Learning Essential Skills at Wildlife Rescue Hospital

Like many other birds, Black-headed Grosbeak breed in British Columbia and then migrate south to warmer climates. The Black-headed Grosbeak males are easily identifiable by its orange breasts, blackheads, and black and white wings. Females have brown heads and orange and brown breasts. Both males and females have large bills that assist them in gleaning foliage and assembling nests.

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Strike Two for Sociable Birds

Waxwing’s diet mainly revolves around fruits and berries (such as strawberries, mulberries, and raspberries). Large quantities of over-ripe fruit that contain alcohol sugar from the fruit converts into alcohol through fermentation. This can be fatal for a Cedar Waxwings diet by causing disorientation leading to window strikes.

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How to Protect Ground Nesting Wildlife

Recently, two baby Killdeer were rescued after someone found them abandoned with no parents nearby. Wildlife Rescue staff suspect the parents may potentially be struck by a vehicle or other urban challenges, an all-too-common occurrence this time of year.
Killdeer nest on the ground or flat roofs until the eggs hatch 24 days later. The parents look after their young until they are ready to take flight after approximately 25 days. These two babies will be raised at the Wildlife Rescue’s hospital until they are young adults and are capable of surviving on their own.

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