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Salmonella Outbreak in Pine Siskins FAQ

Wildlife Rescue is currently admitting record-breaking numbers of Pine Siskins showing symptoms of Salmonella infection. Here are some commonly asked questions regarding this outbreak answered!


Salmonella Outbreak in Siskins

It is an irruptive year for Pine Siskins! Each Winter, these nomadic finches range widely and erratically across North America, their migrations heavily food driven. These past few months, dense flocks of siskins have been seen across the Pacific Northwest. It is believed that the staggering numbers of Pine Siskins are due to a shortage of food in the northern range of siskins in Canada’s boreal forest. 


Hummingbirds a Frequent Sight in the Winter!

Hummingbirds – a crowd favourite, miniature acrobats that dart and dip, hunting for high-energy foods.

Although these tiny birds weigh less than a loonie (averaging between 3 and 6 grams), hummingbirds need to be almost constantly eating. Hummingbirds flap their wings 50 times or more per second in order to maintain their signature hovering flight. Undoubtedly, this requires an immense amount of energy. In order to fuel their flight, hummingbirds consume half their body weight in pure sugar every day!


Helping our Feathered Friends in the Winter

 

This time of year, wildlife needs your help more than ever. Whether it is because they are late migrators, cold winter snaps, or they just do not have enough body fat to stay warm.
We can do our part and help winter wildlife thrive in the winter months!


Bat Hibernation

While the nights get longer and the weather gets colder, bats seek out places to hibernate. Bats may seek out abandoned mines, caves, and other shelters like peoples’ homes, barns, and garages.  

While having a bat sharing the same space with you may seem a little scary, bats seek the shelter of your spaces, for survival. Micro species of bats, like Little Brown Bats, are vulnerable to predators that do not hibernate, like raccoons and owls. 


Have you seen the Northern Saw-whet Owl?

Traipsing around a mature forest near a river, you spot a small, hunkering puffball in the dense foliage. It’s standing stock-still as if any slight movement will betray its presence. You look closer and see two bright, amber eyes staring fiercely back at you.

Later, when you leave the area, you hear a high-pitched, rhythmic tooting that sounds almost like electronic beeping. You were right: you were lucky to have spotted a Northern Saw-whet Owl!


Winter is Flush with Thrushes

Thrushes, including the Varied Thrush and the Hermit Thrush, are birds we see often at Wildlife Rescue. They face growing challenges and obstacles navigating in their natural habitat due to human and natural disturbances.


Maintaining Your Hummingbird Feeder

Hummingbird feeders are a great way to observe these beautiful birds while providing them a source of energy! Feeders can be especially important to Anna’s Hummingbird, a species that stays throughout the year, and to other species that may be delayed in their migration. While it may seem like a simple thing, hummingbird feeders require more attention than just filling them with sugar water.


Preparing for Hooting Season!

We tend to associate the Fall months with full moons, falling leaves, and owls. Why owls? It is this time of year when you are most likely to spot an owl as it is nesting season for several species of owls! The owl you are most likely to see during this time is the Great Horned Owl.
Great Horned Owls live throughout North America year-round. They are larger than other North American owls (up to 2 feet in height), and so other owl species will not risk nesting near them.


Wildlife Seek Warmth During Cold Snaps

Unfortunately, extreme weather conditions are becoming more and more common. This intensification of weather is adding stress to wildlife species and their habitats. Animals, just like people, tend to choose areas where they prefer the climate. Yet, these climates are rapidly changing leading to loss of habitat and natural food sources.