Tag: wildliferescue

Waterfowl Wildlife Prone to Human Disturbances

Double-crested cormorants make their nesting homes on the coastlines of southern BC. They are an iridescent greenish-black, with a bright yellow beak, and white tufts over their eyes during the breeding season. They like to hang out on rocky shorelines and dive for fish.

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Spring into Action

Every year, signs of spring fill the air as we feel the temperatures lifting, hear the chorus of year-round and migratory birds returning and the smell of fresh green grass as we step outside. It’s the perfect time to welcome this revitalizing energy into your backyard by preparing for these feathered friends.

In British Columbia Chickadees, Sparrows, Starlings, Robins, Northern Flickers, Bushtits, Finches, Steller’s Jay and Hummingbirds are a few of the common backyard birds looking for mates and shelter to thrive during the busy season.

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Have you seen the Northern Saw-whet Owl?

Traipsing around a mature forest near a river, you spot a small, hunkering puffball in the dense foliage. It’s standing stock-still as if any slight movement will betray its presence. You look closer and see two bright, amber eyes staring fiercely back at you.

Later, when you leave the area, you hear a high-pitched, rhythmic tooting that sounds almost like electronic beeping. You were right: you were lucky to have spotted a Northern Saw-whet Owl!

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Sora waterbird with a Candy-Corn Bill Survives Cat Attack

The Sora is a small waterbird of the family Rallidae, sometimes referred to as the sora rail or sora crake. This small chicken-like bird is chubby with uniquely long toes that help it to tackle floating vegetation when searching for food. Soras are grayish-brown with white-edged feathers, a dark throat patch with vertical white lines, a black mask from the bill to the eye and a white patch under the tail.  The bill is bright yellow which might make you think of Hallowe’en candy corns.

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Specialized Treatment for Juvenile Steller’s Jay

Wildlife Rescue Association of BC is a leader in rehabilitating wildlife and in promoting the welfare of wild animals in urban environments. To fully execute this mission Wildlife Rescue staff and volunteers to practice species-specific care for all wildlife including those vulnerable to imprinting and habituation.
This care is essential for the healthy development and rehabilitation for each animal, so they are successful in their natural environments upon release.

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Rooftop Fledglings Face Challenges

A familiar sight on British Columbia’s coastline, gulls are both a staple and a nuisance to those in public places. No matter your stance, we can agree that gulls are a crucial part of BC’s ecosystem and biodiversity – a part that keeps the population of their prey (such as fish) in line. Canada Geese are also an important part of British Columbia’s ecosystem since their method of gathering food (grazing) spreads seeds and allows plants to grow. These two bird species are seen nesting on rooftops in the lower mainland this time of year, where they have adapted their natural nesting behaviour to large buildings and busy cities.

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How to Protect Ground Nesting Wildlife

Recently, two baby Killdeer were rescued after someone found them abandoned with no parents nearby. Wildlife Rescue staff suspect the parents may potentially be struck by a vehicle or other urban challenges, an all-too-common occurrence this time of year.
Killdeer nest on the ground or flat roofs until the eggs hatch 24 days later. The parents look after their young until they are ready to take flight after approximately 25 days. These two babies will be raised at the Wildlife Rescue’s hospital until they are young adults and are capable of surviving on their own.

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California Quail Ready to be Released in Osoyoos!

Staff and volunteers have worked hard in the last 3 weeks, providing, much-needed warmth and a nutritional diet of seeds, chick mix, and insects to ensure these babies can make it into adulthood and safely return home. They are now half their adult weight and are growing their flight feathers and crest feathers.

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Today is North American Eagle Day!

Since 1995, North American Eagle Day has been celebrated across the globe. This regal bird and spiritual symbol for Indigenous people once became endangered by hunting and pesticides. After pesticides were banned, laws to protect these eagles were put in place to protect these vulnerable species. This special day celebrates the population growth of Bald Eagles since their protection and endangerment scare in the 1960s.

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Steller’s Jay Fledglings Rescued after Predator Attacks

Many birds are harmed each year due to predator attacks – birds such as Steller’s Jays are often hurt after being ambushed by a cat when foraging on ground-level. Fledgling Steller’s Jays are even more vulnerable, they spent time on the ground learning how to fly. You can help prevent predator attacks in your yard!

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