Tag: bcwildlife

Winter Bat Sightings – What you can do!

Bats can live in a variety of habitats including deserts, woodlands, caves, suburban communities, and cities. Because they are nocturnal, they hunt at night and roost during the day. Bats play an important role in our environment directly and behind-the-scenes. Bats help pollinate plants and at night they act as “pest control agents” eating thousands of mosquitoes and other insects in an hour.

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Hummingbirds a Frequent Sight in the Winter!

Hummingbirds – a crowd favourite, miniature acrobats that dart and dip, hunting for high-energy foods.

Although these tiny birds weigh less than a loonie (averaging between 3 and 6 grams), hummingbirds need to be almost constantly eating. Hummingbirds flap their wings 50 times or more per second in order to maintain their signature hovering flight. Undoubtedly, this requires an immense amount of energy. In order to fuel their flight, hummingbirds consume half their body weight in pure sugar every day!

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What is your Favorite Winter Bird?

Canada has a wide range of bird species. In British Columbia, we may host bird species for a longer period or at different times of the year, than other parts of Canada. 

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Bat Hibernation

While the nights get longer and the weather gets colder, bats seek out places to hibernate. Bats may seek out abandoned mines, caves, and other shelters like peoples’ homes, barns, and garages.  

While having a bat sharing the same space with you may seem a little scary, bats seek the shelter of your spaces, for survival. Micro species of bats, like Little Brown Bats, are vulnerable to predators that do not hibernate, like raccoons and owls. 

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Happy International Volunteer Day!

Today is International Volunteer Day and Wildlife Rescue Association of BC is grateful for the volunteers and their hard work, commitment and service they share with wildlife 365 days a year. Wildlife has a second chance at life because of you! Thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

There are many components and tasks that volunteers take on from answering the phone, receiving the injured animal, providing health checks, caring for the wildlife, releasing wildlife and transporting injured and orphaned wildlife to name a few. The work is continuous and difficult at times but volunteers get the job done gracefully. Today we honor a few of our volunteers and their experience as Wildlife enthusiasts and volunteers.

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Give the Gift of Hope!

Giving Tuesday is a day dedicated to giving back, supporting the causes that matter most to you. As a wildlife lover, you can give the gift of hope and help injured wildlife from rescue to release.
Right now, we have dozens of animals in care that need your support. Birds like this young Swainson’s Thrush who was admitted to Wildlife Rescue after flying straight into a window. Although birds have excellent vision, surpassing humans in many ways, window strikes are common as birds see open sky and trees reflected in the glass. Hitting a solid pane of glass at full speed can be fatal.

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Winter is Flush with Thrushes

Thrushes, including the Varied Thrush and the Hermit Thrush, are birds we see often at Wildlife Rescue. They face growing challenges and obstacles navigating in their natural habitat due to human and natural disturbances.

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Preparing for Hooting Season!

We tend to associate the Fall months with full moons, falling leaves, and owls. Why owls? It is this time of year when you are most likely to spot an owl as it is nesting season for several species of owls! The owl you are most likely to see during this time is the Great Horned Owl.
Great Horned Owls live throughout North America year-round. They are larger than other North American owls (up to 2 feet in height), and so other owl species will not risk nesting near them.

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Wildlife Seek Warmth During Cold Snaps

Unfortunately, extreme weather conditions are becoming more and more common. This intensification of weather is adding stress to wildlife species and their habitats. Animals, just like people, tend to choose areas where they prefer the climate. Yet, these climates are rapidly changing leading to loss of habitat and natural food sources.

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Happy Batty Halloween

While there are approximately 1,300 different bat species around the world, there are only approximately 19 different species across Canada. British Columbia alone holds 16 of those species, making it the most diverse province in Canada! These 16 different species are all different and incredibly important to our diverse ecosystems. Wildlife Rescue provides care to many of these bats including the Silver-Haired Bat, Little Brown Bat, Yuma Bat, Hoary and Big Brown Bat. 

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