Tag: bcwildlife

Saving Small Nests

Every year from around mid-March to late August, the lower mainland is filled with birds finding habitats, constructing nests, and nesting. For birds, their mating season is extremely important – after all, this is the period in which they lay eggs and watch their kids grow up!

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Glue Traps: A Sticky Situation

Every year, Wildlife Rescue provides care to hundreds of wildlife impacted by glue traps and flypaper. These inhumane methods to prevent unwanted guests inside and outside our homes causes horrific injuries and sometimes death to vulnerable wildlife.  

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A Day in the Life of a Wildlife Care Assistant

Feeding. Cleaning. Health checks. Feeding. Cleaning. Health checks.

A day in the life of a Wildlife Care Assistant may sound repetitive, but each day brings new challenges that will keep you on your toes, and new inspiration that connects you to nature and animals.

Your main responsibility is to the baby birds – you are there to care for them throughout their development and rehabilitation. The tiniest of babies need to be fed every 15-minutes. So, when you have a room full of babies, it can be an endless circuit of feeding. Yet, somewhere in-between the feeds you need to clean them and their enclosures, and assess their development.

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A Day in the Life of a Wildlife Helpline & Rescue Assistant

Phone call, after phone call after phone call…our incredibly busy Helpline responds to approximately 28 000 calls per year, with the bulk of them coming in during the busy summer months.

Wildlife Helpline and Rescue Assistants (WHRAs) receive intensive training in natural history and urban wildlife challenges so they can help the thousands of people reaching out to our Helpline find solutions to their unique wildlife situations – from raccoons in the attic to orphaned ducklings walking down a busy street.

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Wetlands and Wildlife

Today is #WorldWetlandsDay, crucial to our environment, wetlands provide a habitat for a variety of animals such as fish, birds, invertebrates and are an essential part of the earth’s ecosystem. Despite how essential they are to the environment, wetlands are facing challenges daily across the globe.

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Winter Bat Sightings – What you can do!

Bats can live in a variety of habitats including deserts, woodlands, caves, suburban communities, and cities. Because they are nocturnal, they hunt at night and roost during the day. Bats play an important role in our environment directly and behind-the-scenes. Bats help pollinate plants and at night they act as “pest control agents” eating thousands of mosquitoes and other insects in an hour.

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Hummingbirds a Frequent Sight in the Winter!

Hummingbirds – a crowd favourite, miniature acrobats that dart and dip, hunting for high-energy foods.

Although these tiny birds weigh less than a loonie (averaging between 3 and 6 grams), hummingbirds need to be almost constantly eating. Hummingbirds flap their wings 50 times or more per second in order to maintain their signature hovering flight. Undoubtedly, this requires an immense amount of energy. In order to fuel their flight, hummingbirds consume half their body weight in pure sugar every day!

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What is your Favorite Winter Bird?

Canada has a wide range of bird species. In British Columbia, we may host bird species for a longer period or at different times of the year, than other parts of Canada. 

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Bat Hibernation

While the nights get longer and the weather gets colder, bats seek out places to hibernate. Bats may seek out abandoned mines, caves, and other shelters like peoples’ homes, barns, and garages.  

While having a bat sharing the same space with you may seem a little scary, bats seek the shelter of your spaces, for survival. Micro species of bats, like Little Brown Bats, are vulnerable to predators that do not hibernate, like raccoons and owls. 

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Happy International Volunteer Day!

Today is International Volunteer Day and Wildlife Rescue Association of BC is grateful for the volunteers and their hard work, commitment and service they share with wildlife 365 days a year. Wildlife has a second chance at life because of you! Thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

There are many components and tasks that volunteers take on from answering the phone, receiving the injured animal, providing health checks, caring for the wildlife, releasing wildlife and transporting injured and orphaned wildlife to name a few. The work is continuous and difficult at times but volunteers get the job done gracefully. Today we honor a few of our volunteers and their experience as Wildlife enthusiasts and volunteers.

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