Tag: wildliferescuebc

Protect Your Local Killdeers

Due to their friendly nature, Killdeer are unafraid of inhabiting urban areas – which can lead them to great harm. Sports fields, golf courses, and lawns are open spots that Killdeer love. Unfortunately, these man-made open fields often use pesticides and frequently mow to keep the grass at a satisfactory level, which can harm fledglings a great deal. Pesticides, when ingested, are dangerous – and the loss of insects because of insecticides can lower their chance of survival. When Killdeer lose insects, they lose a vital food source. As well, Killdeer often nest roadside, leaving them vulnerable to vehicle collisions.

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Waterfowl Wildlife Prone to Human Disturbances

Double-crested cormorants make their nesting homes on the coastlines of southern BC. They are an iridescent greenish-black, with a bright yellow beak, and white tufts over their eyes during the breeding season. They like to hang out on rocky shorelines and dive for fish.

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Rooftop Goslings Continue to Face Challenges

Spring is one of the busiest times of the year for Wildlife Rescue especially with “Rooftop Rescues”. Last year, the rescue team was managing 10 rescues a day to save fluffy little goslings and bringing them to safety with their families.

While nesting on rooftops seems like a safe place for goslings, it can be very dangerous for young geese. To make sure goslings are not harmed by rooftop nesting, the best thing we can do is prevent it!

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Wetlands and Wildlife

Today is #WorldWetlandsDay, crucial to our environment, wetlands provide a habitat for a variety of animals such as fish, birds, invertebrates and are an essential part of the earth’s ecosystem. Despite how essential they are to the environment, wetlands are facing challenges daily across the globe.

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Hummingbirds a Frequent Sight in the Winter!

Hummingbirds – a crowd favourite, miniature acrobats that dart and dip, hunting for high-energy foods.

Although these tiny birds weigh less than a loonie (averaging between 3 and 6 grams), hummingbirds need to be almost constantly eating. Hummingbirds flap their wings 50 times or more per second in order to maintain their signature hovering flight. Undoubtedly, this requires an immense amount of energy. In order to fuel their flight, hummingbirds consume half their body weight in pure sugar every day!

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What is your Favorite Winter Bird?

Canada has a wide range of bird species. In British Columbia, we may host bird species for a longer period or at different times of the year, than other parts of Canada. 

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Helping our Feathered Friends in the Winter

 

This time of year, wildlife needs your help more than ever. Whether it is because they are late migrators, cold winter snaps, or they just do not have enough body fat to stay warm.
We can do our part and help winter wildlife thrive in the winter months!

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Happy International Volunteer Day!

Today is International Volunteer Day and Wildlife Rescue Association of BC is grateful for the volunteers and their hard work, commitment and service they share with wildlife 365 days a year. Wildlife has a second chance at life because of you! Thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

There are many components and tasks that volunteers take on from answering the phone, receiving the injured animal, providing health checks, caring for the wildlife, releasing wildlife and transporting injured and orphaned wildlife to name a few. The work is continuous and difficult at times but volunteers get the job done gracefully. Today we honor a few of our volunteers and their experience as Wildlife enthusiasts and volunteers.

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Have you seen the Northern Saw-whet Owl?

Traipsing around a mature forest near a river, you spot a small, hunkering puffball in the dense foliage. It’s standing stock-still as if any slight movement will betray its presence. You look closer and see two bright, amber eyes staring fiercely back at you.

Later, when you leave the area, you hear a high-pitched, rhythmic tooting that sounds almost like electronic beeping. You were right: you were lucky to have spotted a Northern Saw-whet Owl!

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Maintaining Your Hummingbird Feeder

Hummingbird feeders are a great way to observe these beautiful birds while providing them a source of energy! Feeders can be especially important to Anna’s Hummingbird, a species that stays throughout the year, and to other species that may be delayed in their migration. While it may seem like a simple thing, hummingbird feeders require more attention than just filling them with sugar water.

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