Tag: wildlifebc

Oil-Based Pollution Continues to Harm Wildlife

Patients who fall victim to contamination due to oil pollution arrive at Wildlife Rescue hospital in critical condition and have a hard time regulating their body temperature efficiently. They have poor and weakened feather structure that is critical for waterproofing.  Once the oil has touched the bird’s plumage the bird tries to compensate for the loss of body heat by using its fat stores. This process of compensation is extremely exhausting for the bird and causing weakness and health complications if not treated immediately.

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Tender Care for Eurasian Collared-Dove

Over the last 10 years, the Eurasian Collared-Dove who often is mistaken for a pigeon has become a frequent visitor and resident on the west coast of Canada. Their history originates from Asia to the Bahamas in the 70’s and slowly into the United States where they were found in Florida and moving further into other parts of North America. These exotic birds are still scarce, but the numbers are increasing as bird watchers are noticing their presence throughout the lower mainland, Fraser Valley, Okanagan, and along the coast.

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Unfortunate Outcome for Rare Pelagic Cormorant

Recently, one juvenile Pelagic Cormorant was found on Granville street bridge where a Good Samaritan rescued him just before he was hit by a car. Unfortunately, incidents like these are a common occurrence – many birds nest on the bridge trestles (under the bridge on the structure/framework), making them more at-risk to car accidents, human disturbances and predatorial challenges.

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Fighting Chance for Red Crossbill Pair

Recently, two nestlings were in critical need of supportive care after they were found abandoned in Stanley Park. The kind-hearted Samaritan monitored the surroundings for a few hours in hope of parents to return but without any luck, it was evident the nestlings wouldn’t survive much longer without nutrition, hydration and potential predator attack at their vulnerable stage.

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Annual Volunteer Appreciation

We are so lucky to be celebrating over 200 volunteers who’ve dedicated their time to Wildlife Rescue this past year and this quote speaks to 2020 perfectly, “There’s no time like the present, and no present like the time” – James Durst. Together we survived a global pandemic and 90% of our volunteers stuck by us. As well, about 50 new volunteers joined us in our cause! This proves how much our volunteers care and we want them to know that their time is truly one of the most generous gifts they can give to us, as it allowed us to keep our doors open for animals in need.

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Specialized Treatment for Juvenile Steller’s Jay

Wildlife Rescue Association of BC is a leader in rehabilitating wildlife and in promoting the welfare of wild animals in urban environments. To fully execute this mission Wildlife Rescue staff and volunteers to practice species-specific care for all wildlife including those vulnerable to imprinting and habituation.
This care is essential for the healthy development and rehabilitation for each animal, so they are successful in their natural environments upon release.

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Group of California Quail Ready to Return Home

The large group of quails has been growing and developing slowly over the last few weeks and has gained weight and are starting to show signs of flight. They are not in the final stage of their pre-conditioning release and in a large enclosure that mimics their natural environment.

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Navigating Bats in Your Community

Wildlife Rescue Support Centre has been busy answering curious finders and coordinating the increased appearance of bats in the last 3 months. Although the majority of the 208 of calls are inquiries only about bat safety and protocol, Wildlife Rescue has seen a surge in the number of bats who need supportive care and treatment.

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Rare Albino Northwestern Crow Looking for Support!

The most common crow sighting in British Columbia you will see along the shorelines is the Northwestern crow. Unlike American Crows, Northwestern Crows are smaller with a deeper voice and are often found along beaches, islands or at landfill sites searching for scraps of food. These large passerines have a long, thick bill, broad wings, and a moderately long tail. The highly sociable birds communicate visually when in flight or through their distinct calls. They soar beautifully in the sky and play with each other on the wing, chasing and swooping one another aggressively.

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Abandoned Nestling Learning Essential Skills at Wildlife Rescue Hospital

Like many other birds, Black-headed Grosbeak breed in British Columbia and then migrate south to warmer climates. The Black-headed Grosbeak males are easily identifiable by its orange breasts, blackheads, and black and white wings. Females have brown heads and orange and brown breasts. Both males and females have large bills that assist them in gleaning foliage and assembling nests.

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