Tag: savelocalwildlife

Spotted Towhee Survives Nest Disturbance

A familiar sight in British Columbia, male Spotted Towhees have reddish-orange flanks, black wings, and grey underwings, though the females have grey wings instead of black. These clever sparrows tend to dart from place to place by hopping rather than flying since they mainly forage for insects (such as beetles, ladybugs, crickets, grasshoppers, moths, and spiders), berries, seeds, and acorns (such as raspberries, blackberries, chickweed, oats, corn, and cherries).

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Learn to Co-Exist With Bats!

Bats contribute to our environment in both invisible and visible ways. At night, they are our pest control, since one bat can eat as many as a thousand mosquitoes in an hour. Not only do they control pest populations (which aids the agricultural industry), bats can also pollinate plants. It has been estimated that a hungry bat can devour up to 3,000 insects in one night! Not only does this reduce the need for farmers to use pesticides, but it also helps manage the overpopulation of certain insect groups (including mosquitoes).

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Great Blue Heron Fledglings Need Your Help!

Great Blue Herons are a familiar sight on British Columbia’s coast with wide wings, long “S” shaped necks, and grey-blue feathers. Their remarkably still stance in water, the plumes on their heads, and the black line above their eyes make them distinctive from any other bird.

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Celebrating World Rainforest Day

Home to half of the world’s species, World Rainforest Day was created in 2017, to take action to combat deforestation, reduce the effects of climate change, and protect our rainforest. World Rainforest Day aims to help restore and regenerate healthy rainforests in your local communities.

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