Tag: localwildlife

Salmonella Outbreak in Pine Siskins FAQ

Wildlife Rescue is currently admitting record-breaking numbers of Pine Siskins showing symptoms of Salmonella infection. Here are some commonly asked questions regarding this outbreak answered!

Read More

Winter is Flush with Thrushes

Thrushes, including the Varied Thrush and the Hermit Thrush, are birds we see often at Wildlife Rescue. They face growing challenges and obstacles navigating in their natural habitat due to human and natural disturbances.

Read More

Spotted Towhee Survives Nest Disturbance

A familiar sight in British Columbia, male Spotted Towhees have reddish-orange flanks, black wings, and grey underwings, though the females have grey wings instead of black. These clever sparrows tend to dart from place to place by hopping rather than flying since they mainly forage for insects (such as beetles, ladybugs, crickets, grasshoppers, moths, and spiders), berries, seeds, and acorns (such as raspberries, blackberries, chickweed, oats, corn, and cherries).

Read More

Today is North American Eagle Day!

Since 1995, North American Eagle Day has been celebrated across the globe. This regal bird and spiritual symbol for Indigenous people once became endangered by hunting and pesticides. After pesticides were banned, laws to protect these eagles were put in place to protect these vulnerable species. This special day celebrates the population growth of Bald Eagles since their protection and endangerment scare in the 1960s.

Read More

Great Blue Heron, Big Blue Needs our Help After Window Strike

Caring for Great Blue Heron such as this is a lot of work. They require constant attention-particularly when they’re in groups to ensure no violence breaks out. Yet while this is a concern, typically this behavior is only exhibited when there’s a scarcity of resources, so while they’re in care its quickly made clear there’s going to be enough food for all of them.

Read More

Learn to Co-Exist with Vulnerable Wildlife

The Western Painted Turtle is the only native pond turtle left in BC. Currently, they are blue-listed which means they are sensitive to human disturbances and natural occurrences. They are considered vulnerable to habitat loss and are susceptible to human and natural disturbances.

Read More