Tag: explorebcwildlife

Rooftop Fledglings Face Challenges

A familiar sight on British Columbia’s coastline, gulls are both a staple and a nuisance to those in public places. No matter your stance, we can agree that gulls are a crucial part of BC’s ecosystem and biodiversity – a part that keeps the population of their prey (such as fish) in line. Canada Geese are also an important part of British Columbia’s ecosystem since their method of gathering food (grazing) spreads seeds and allows plants to grow. These two bird species are seen nesting on rooftops in the lower mainland this time of year, where they have adapted their natural nesting behaviour to large buildings and busy cities.

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Great Blue Heron Survivors Released to Rookery

Thanks to the efforts of Wildlife Rescue staff and you the young herons were raised under supportive care at Wildlife Rescue hospital. One heron was much older than the other and developed his skills quickly and therefore was released a few weeks earlier and the other joined him a few weeks later.

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Group of California Quail Ready to Return Home

The large group of quails has been growing and developing slowly over the last few weeks and has gained weight and are starting to show signs of flight. They are not in the final stage of their pre-conditioning release and in a large enclosure that mimics their natural environment.

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Western Small-Footed Bat Unique to Wildlife Rescue Hospital

This is a unique species at Wildlife Rescue and has not been its care in the 40 years of operations. It is not known to live within the lower mainland but instead in the dry interior valleys of B.C. Working with the regional biologist and bat specialist we are assessing what and how the bat has come to the lower mainland and if this species will continue to expand their habitat or it is a lone individual in the wrong place.

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How to Protect Ground Nesting Wildlife

Recently, two baby Killdeer were rescued after someone found them abandoned with no parents nearby. Wildlife Rescue staff suspect the parents may potentially be struck by a vehicle or other urban challenges, an all-too-common occurrence this time of year.
Killdeer nest on the ground or flat roofs until the eggs hatch 24 days later. The parents look after their young until they are ready to take flight after approximately 25 days. These two babies will be raised at the Wildlife Rescue’s hospital until they are young adults and are capable of surviving on their own.

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Celebrating World Rainforest Day

Home to half of the world’s species, World Rainforest Day was created in 2017, to take action to combat deforestation, reduce the effects of climate change, and protect our rainforest. World Rainforest Day aims to help restore and regenerate healthy rainforests in your local communities.

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Today is North American Eagle Day!

Since 1995, North American Eagle Day has been celebrated across the globe. This regal bird and spiritual symbol for Indigenous people once became endangered by hunting and pesticides. After pesticides were banned, laws to protect these eagles were put in place to protect these vulnerable species. This special day celebrates the population growth of Bald Eagles since their protection and endangerment scare in the 1960s.

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Majestic Endangered American White Pelican Released to his Flock!

Biologists from the Williams Lake region have been on the lookout and recently spotted the White Pelican flock return to one of their breeding grounds at Puntzi Lake, BC. They contacted Wildlife Rescue right away to acknowledge it was safe to move to the next stage. Peli underwent his final health evaluation to ensure he was ready for release to the wild.  
After 8 hours of traveling with Peli safely in a kennel, staff and volunteers arrived at Woodlands Fishing Resort on Puntzi Lake. A sizable remote area where dozens of American White Pelicans fly majestically through daily. A Pelican island exists within viewing distance, making this a perfect spot for the Pelican’s release. 

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