Tag: canadianwildlife

Spotted Towhee Survives Nest Disturbance

A familiar sight in British Columbia, male Spotted Towhees have reddish-orange flanks, black wings, and grey underwings, though the females have grey wings instead of black. These clever sparrows tend to dart from place to place by hopping rather than flying since they mainly forage for insects (such as beetles, ladybugs, crickets, grasshoppers, moths, and spiders), berries, seeds, and acorns (such as raspberries, blackberries, chickweed, oats, corn, and cherries).

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How to Protect Ground Nesting Wildlife

Recently, two baby Killdeer were rescued after someone found them abandoned with no parents nearby. Wildlife Rescue staff suspect the parents may potentially be struck by a vehicle or other urban challenges, an all-too-common occurrence this time of year.
Killdeer nest on the ground or flat roofs until the eggs hatch 24 days later. The parents look after their young until they are ready to take flight after approximately 25 days. These two babies will be raised at the Wildlife Rescue’s hospital until they are young adults and are capable of surviving on their own.

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Support Your Local Wildlife on Canada Day!

Patrolling up and down the rivers and shorelines, the beautiful Belted Kingfisher with its heavy frame and vigorous flight can easily be spotted. Its small feet and large head give it a unique look. The Belted Kingfisher with a shaggy crest on the top and back of its head and a beautiful blue-gray color and fine white spotting on the wing and tail. Females have a broad rusty band on their bellies. 

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