Tag: bcbirds

Glue Traps Pose Challenges to Wildlife

Glue traps are a pest control measure using glue as the method of trapping. The pest gets caught in the glue and then the trap is thrown away. There are two different types of glue traps; flypaper and glue-tray mouse traps.

While they seem simple, glue traps are one of the most inhumane methods of pest control. The animal, once caught in the trap, usually dies of starvation and dehydration over several days. The traps can also snare other wildlife. Since flypaper traps insects, insect-loving birds can become entangled in the flypaper while attempting to feed.

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Waterfowl Wildlife Prone to Human Disturbances

Double-crested cormorants make their nesting homes on the coastlines of southern BC. They are an iridescent greenish-black, with a bright yellow beak, and white tufts over their eyes during the breeding season. They like to hang out on rocky shorelines and dive for fish.

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Rooftop Goslings Continue to Face Challenges

Spring is one of the busiest times of the year for Wildlife Rescue especially with “Rooftop Rescues”. Last year, the rescue team was managing 10 rescues a day to save fluffy little goslings and bringing them to safety with their families.

While nesting on rooftops seems like a safe place for goslings, it can be very dangerous for young geese. To make sure goslings are not harmed by rooftop nesting, the best thing we can do is prevent it!

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Your Donation Helped Build the Medical Treatment Centre!

Your generous response enabled construction of the Medical Treatment Centre to be completed just a few months before COVID-19. Thank you for making this project a reality!

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Accidental Nest Removal and Disturbance

This time of year, migrating birds choose British Columbia’s beautiful trees and forests as a spot to lay their eggs and start their families. This beautiful journey often has challenges, one being nest removal and nest disturbance.

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Spring into Action

Every year, signs of spring fill the air as we feel the temperatures lifting, hear the chorus of year-round and migratory birds returning and the smell of fresh green grass as we step outside. It’s the perfect time to welcome this revitalizing energy into your backyard by preparing for these feathered friends.

In British Columbia Chickadees, Sparrows, Starlings, Robins, Northern Flickers, Bushtits, Finches, Steller’s Jay and Hummingbirds are a few of the common backyard birds looking for mates and shelter to thrive during the busy season.

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Wetlands and Wildlife

Today is #WorldWetlandsDay, crucial to our environment, wetlands provide a habitat for a variety of animals such as fish, birds, invertebrates and are an essential part of the earth’s ecosystem. Despite how essential they are to the environment, wetlands are facing challenges daily across the globe.

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Salmonella Outbreak in Siskins

It is an irruptive year for Pine Siskins! Each Winter, these nomadic finches range widely and erratically across North America, their migrations heavily food driven. These past few months, dense flocks of siskins have been seen across the Pacific Northwest. It is believed that the staggering numbers of Pine Siskins are due to a shortage of food in the northern range of siskins in Canada’s boreal forest. 

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Have you seen the Northern Saw-whet Owl?

Traipsing around a mature forest near a river, you spot a small, hunkering puffball in the dense foliage. It’s standing stock-still as if any slight movement will betray its presence. You look closer and see two bright, amber eyes staring fiercely back at you.

Later, when you leave the area, you hear a high-pitched, rhythmic tooting that sounds almost like electronic beeping. You were right: you were lucky to have spotted a Northern Saw-whet Owl!

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Winter is Flush with Thrushes

Thrushes, including the Varied Thrush and the Hermit Thrush, are birds we see often at Wildlife Rescue. They face growing challenges and obstacles navigating in their natural habitat due to human and natural disturbances.

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