Tag: wildliferescuebc

California Quail Babies Fighting to Survive

California Quail are rare in the lower mainland. In 2019 Wildlife Rescue only provided care to three California Quail related to predator attacks and possible orphans. With nests in secluded areas in the ground near tall grass, tree trunks, and rocks, Quail can easily be injured by both predators and curious humans.

Read More

Majestic Endangered American White Pelican Released to his Flock!

Biologists from the Williams Lake region have been on the lookout and recently spotted the White Pelican flock return to one of their breeding grounds at Puntzi Lake, BC. They contacted Wildlife Rescue right away to acknowledge it was safe to move to the next stage. Peli underwent his final health evaluation to ensure he was ready for release to the wild.  
After 8 hours of traveling with Peli safely in a kennel, staff and volunteers arrived at Woodlands Fishing Resort on Puntzi Lake. A sizable remote area where dozens of American White Pelicans fly majestically through daily. A Pelican island exists within viewing distance, making this a perfect spot for the Pelican’s release. 

Read More

Help Prevent Entanglements Due to Fishing Lines in Wildlife

Every year, birds migrate remarkably long distances across the globe. Since 1993, people around the world have celebrated this journey in May through International Migratory Bird Day. Some 14 years later, in 2007, the Environment for the Americas took over... Read More

Wildlife Rescue Volunteers Help Goslings Born on Rooftops

Rooftops especially those with greenery, ponds, and pools have become a popular, attractive nesting site for some parents. These rooftops mimic natural environments for parents who choose to raise their young in hopes to protect them from potential predators from attacking. However, parents do not realize that these rooftops are dangerous for their newly hatched goslings, preventing them from leaving the rooftop safely.

Read More

Help Ground-Nesting Babies This Spring!

Spring and summer are a particularly sensitive time of year for ground-nesting birds. We need your help to ensure ground-nesting wildlife like the northern junco, hermit thrushes, and meadowlark are among species that can lay and protect their eggs safely. One of the most common and easily forgotten human disturbance during spring is lawn mowing.

Read More

Found an Orphaned Wildlife Baby?

One of the clearest signs of spring is the reappearance of migrating birds and readily available sources of food including seeds, insects, and fruit. Migrating birds return to their breeding grounds early spring and midsummer to reproduce. They tend to find trees, rooftops, wetlands, and ponds to prepare for their nesting season.

Read More

Help Protect Babies This Season

Assess the circumstances when you first notice a baby. Take note of their energy levels and behavior to distinguish if this bird needs your help or if it should be left alone. If it is a hatchling or appears weak and quiet, it may need help. Birds parents will leave their young to collect food or water and return shortly.

Read More

Save Birds From the Danger of Your Windows

The windows in our homes are a huge danger to our neighborhood birds. In the spring, birds are migrating north to find the best place for nesting and raising their young. As they are navigating our yards they can fly into windows because the foliage and sky are reflecting, making it look as though the animal can fly through.

Read More

Happy Reunition

This relaxed attitude of the bushtits and heroic residents from a local community in East Vancouver, BC helped Wildlife Rescue reunite a fallen nest back to its parents within 24 hours.

Read More

Long-term Care & Treatment for Peli

In situations like this we want to encourage the public to call our wildlife response line immediately so we can prevent injuries and infections from escalating and start medical treatment before starvation, infection, and death occurs,” says Janelle Stephenson, Hospital Manager at Wildlife Rescue Association of BC.

Read More
« Previous